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Golf Rules

Golf Rules

When you look at the game of golf, it seems fairly simple. You have a golf club, a golf ball, and a wide playing field. The only thing that the player needs to do is get the ball from the start, the tee box, to the hole marked with a flag.

Most people already know that you aren’t supposed to touch the ball but there are a lot more rules that you need to know if you want to play.

This guide goes over all the basics: player rules, important equipment, getting around the golf course, and the rules of the game.

Chapter 1

Origins

The origin of golf is very challenging to decipher when looking at each region history. The description of the golf game makes it difficult to determine the exact history of golf.

Many describe the golf game as a ball-and-stick type sport. This type of sports dates back to the 2600 B.C. era. Listed below are some of the mentions of the ball-and-stick games.

2600 BC Egypt: A ball-and-stick type sport was mention in 2600 BC in Middle Egypt. There are images of players on the tomb of Kehti Beni Hasan. The Greeks, most likely adopted game from the Egyptians.

100 BC: The Romans developed an early form of golf called Paganica. The game consisted of a stuffed leather ball and a bent wooden stick. The balls were larger, and they range in size from five to five and a half inches in diameter. The object of the game was to hit a target, which could be either tree, a rock or something else. Two teams played in the opposite direction, similar to hockey.

960-1279: Chuíw án is a similar game to golf. The Chinese played the game at several clubs during the Song Dynasty.

1261: Jacob van Mae Maerlant, a Flemish poet, mention the game of kolf (golf) in the dutch manuscript in 1261. This was the earliest mention of the game in the Dutch language. Kolf was very popular in Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg.

1297: The Dutch played the game with a stick and leather ball in Loenen. The object of the game is to put the ball in a hole using golf clubs. The winner is the person with fewer strokes to the spot a few hundred yards in the distance.

1360: Brussels council banned the game of golf/colf. If anyone played, there would be a fine or the confiscation of an overcoat.

The Modern game (the big debate, Scottish or not?)


Scotland is known as the home of golf, and it is seen worldwide as the national cultural icon of Scotland. The modern-day game of hitting a small ball with a stick around a course of 18 holes is a Scotland origin.

However, there are reports the game originated elsewhere. They believed there was a golf-like game played in continental Europe. Many scholars argue that the game originated in 17th-century Netherlands and that this time frame predates the game in Scotland.

Scholars argue the word golf was thought to be an alternate word for 'colf,' which is a Dutch term meaning stick or club. The Dutch version of the game related to a game where the lowest number of strokes need to hit a ball with a mallet into a hole determines the winner.

Early golf in Scotland

Most modern sports have origins in earlier games that goes back thousands of years. Golf is no different. Like most recent games, golf developed into a recognizable version.

Golf differs from other sports in that the origins lie in the stick-and-ball games of ancient times. The modern game dates back as far as the 1400s in Scotland.

The 1457 Act, which prohibited golf, of the Scottish Parliament documented golf in Scotland. King James II prohibited golf because he believed the popularity of the sport was a distraction from military training.

In the 1500s, however, King James IV became captivated with the sport. When there was a short term of peace, King James IV engaged in the sports and allowed others to do so.

There is proof that expatriates, immigrant and Scottish soldiers took the sport to the British colonies during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Chapter 2

Associations Develop

By the end of the 1800s, golf popularity increased in the U.S. Golf popularity led to a need for an organizing body. In1894, delegates from the area golf clubs met to form a golf organization. The delegates represented Yonkers New York, Southampton New York, Brookline Massachusetts Chicago and Newport Rhode Island.

In 1894, the United States Golf Association (USGA), which is a governing body, was created in New York. The governing body is for the U.S. and Mexico national association of clubs, facilities and golf courses. It establishes rules for the game and administers the golf championship.

There are five charter member the USGA, and they are:

-St. Andrew Golf Club of Yonkers, New York
-Newport (Rhode Island) Golf Club
-Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Southampton, New York
-The Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts
-Chicago Golf Club in Wheaton, Illinois.

USGA serves as a referee for rules, questions and general information on amateur status. In 1916, the USGA changed the name to Professional Golf Association of America (PGA).

Both professionals and amateurs are now allowed to play in the British Open, and the U.S. Open. However, they are not allowed to play in the Accenture Match Play Championship, the Arnold Palmer Invitational and the Golf Championships.

The Ruling Authority (R&A), which is the ruling authority of golf throughout the world except for U.S. and Mexico and the USGA interprets and makes the rules of golf. The USGA does the following:

-Provides national handicap
-Conducts 14 national championships
-Test golf equipment for adherence to regulations

Britain


In ancient times, golf originated as the stick and ball game of the sport that's played today. Golf dates back to the 1400s in Britain.

When James VI of Scotland took the throne in England in 1603, he and his court played golf at the Blackheath course in London. 

Mary, the Queen of Scots and the ruling class, contributed to the rise of the sports. 

Queen Mary played golf often, and her students carried her clubs, whom she called cadet. Many believe that the word cadet is the origin of the word caddie.

In the 1600s, James I lifted the ban on playing golf on Sunday. He also appointed the official golf clubs and golf ball makers.

James II arranged the first international match between Scotland and England. The game of golf slowly became popular outside of Scotland. However, there were several notable courses outside of Scotland.

In the early 1770s, British slave traders built the first African golf course on Bunce Island in Sierra Leone. Below are notables reminders of the oldest golf clubs and golf excursion outside of the British Isles.

-In 1844 the Mauritius Gymkhana Club was built

-1829, the Royal Calcutta Golf Club

-1856 the Pau (the oldest golf course in continental Europe_.

Golf became widely popular in the 19th century outside of Scotland.

The United States and Canada

A vast majority of the nineteenth centuries golf had a difficult time gaining popularity in the U.S. The nation at the time was busy building rebuilding itself after the Civil War. When America found time for sports, it was horseracing, baseball and boxing.


However, there is evidence of golf in America during the 17th century. For example, in 1650, a group of men played golf for points near Fort Orange (Albany New York). And, in 1657, a group of men were cited and warned not to play golf, and in 1659, an ordinance was issued to prevent golf in Albany New York, because of broken windows.

In the 1800s golf thrive in the United Kingdom. However, it slowly began to spread outside the shores of Britain. The U.S. was slowly catching on to golf craze.

In 1873, Canada Royal Montreal Club was the first golf club in North America. The club members played on Dixie (formerly known as Fletcher Field). The name Dixie derived from Southern refugees of the U.S. Civil War. Golf was also played in 1876 at the Niagara and Toronto, Ontario clubs, and in 1879 in the Brantford, Ontario club.

Golf arrived at the tail end of the 18th century mostly in the northeastern part of the United States. The U.S. built the first golf club 15 years after the Canada Royal Montreal Club. In 1888, John Reid, a transplanted Scot, ordered a set of clubs from Tom Morris in St Andrews.

He gathered together a small group of his friends and set out to a three-hole course in the cow pastures of Yonkers, New York. After playing with his friends, the group formed the St. Andrew Club of Yonkers, which is the first golf club in America.

In 1889, a group of Englishmen built the Middlesbrough Golf Club. In 1894, there were a total of nine golf courses in the U.S. Chicago had the first golf course on the coast and the U.S. first 18-hole golf course. Chicago became a popular location for golf because of its 26 golf courses.

Chapter 3

Rules of Golf


In 1744, a small group of gentlemen golfers came together and formed a group called the honourable company of Edinburgh golfers. They are believed to be the oldest golf clubs in the world. In 1754, when the Society of St Andrews came up with the Saint Andrew code, the Honourable company drew up their own set of rules for golf. They framed 13 rules.

The first rule state that your ball must be teed within a club-length of the hole and your tee must be on the ground. The ball that is struck must not be changed, and the ball must be removed from water or water hazard. If you remove it, you must per permit rival a stroke.

Representatives from the British Unions Advisory Committee, the United States, Commonwealth and the European Golf Federation have co-opted to consolidate the codes. At various times the U.S. and Britain have decided to have separate codes. However, in 1967, a uniform code took effect.

The R&A and the USGA are golf rule-making bodies. Their goals were to provide uniformity in the rules of golf by analyzing views, recommendation and interpretation for revisions.

The golfers in St. Andrews established the R&A and embraced the rules of the Leith. Periodical changes were made before R&A was framed to turn the last position in 1897.

Equipment Develops


The allowance of a variety of iron heads is the most notable factor in golf. The introduction of the steel shaft began in the late 1890s, but the governing bodies of golf were slow to adopt them.

In the 1970s, there was a shift in shaft technology for strength characteristics and lightweight. Graphite shaft filled the role with both traits.In the 1980s, metal with its strength and versatility replaced wood.

New golf clubs employ graphite and lightweight titanium heads to increase the size of the clubhead. Modern material strength increases the distance the ball can travel by increasing the spring-like effect of the club. The new materials also allow a much thinner face of the club.

To maintain the challenge of the game, the USGA limited the spring-like effect to .83 and the maximum clubhead size to 460 ccs. The spring-like effect is known as the Coefficient of Restitution.

Golf Balls


For regulation golf balls, the maximum weight of 1.62 ounces and a minimum diameter of 1.6 ounces. The competition velocity of the ball should not exceed 250 ft. However, Britain does require a velocity specification.

The early golf ball


The golf balls made between 14th and 17th centuries composed of hard wood, such as Beach and box trees. In Scotland, however, the balls were filled with cows hair imported from the Netherland.

Feather Era


Later, the feathery ball came to light with a unique process. The feathery cover is a hand-sewn round leather pouch stuff with goose or chicken feathers and coated with white paint. The volume of the feathers should be a top hat full of feathers. The feathers were softened, boiled and stuffed into the leather pouch.

Gutta-percha (gutty)


In 1848, the emergence of the Gutta-percha revolutionized the game.

Dr. Robert Adams Patterson invented Gutta-percha (gutty) ball. Gutta-percha, a milky-like dried sap of the Malaysian sapodilla tree, has a softness and rubber-like feel of the sap. The sap can be heated and shaped in a mold. The sap becomes impressible and soft at boiling temperature. When it cools, it becomes brittle and retains its shape. Cold water does not affect the sap.

In the 1840s, it came to light that the properties of the gutta-percha were ideal for the manufacture of golf balls. The simple process of boiling the sap, molding it and allowing it to dry was efficient in manufacturing of golf balls.

Not only was the sap quickly to manufacture, but it was also cheaper to produce. During the manufacturing process, if a ball was damaged or not perfectly rounded, it could be quickly reformed.

By accident, the damage balls with nick and cuts actually provided a more consistent ball flight than the ball with a perfectly smooth surface.

The manufacturer started intentionally making the indentations on the surface of the new balls using a hammer, or a knife or chisel gave the guddy textured surface. The new protruding knobs left by carvings patterns across the ball surface became known as brambles due to the resemble of the Bramble fruit.

Rubber Ball


In 1903, the Spalding company launched a new ball, which covered with bladder, a natural rubber. The bladder ball is easier to control than the gutta-percha and more durable. The balls with indentations produced better results than the balls with bumps. They also reduced the drag on the ball by increasing turbulence.

 In 1899, George F Grant, one of the first African-American golfers, increase the playability and popularity of golf by introducing the golf tee. 

Grant's invention also increased the average player's opportunity of getting the ball airborne. Players previously made a tee from a pinch of wet dirt or used early tees made from rubber, steel or cardboard.

The 1.62 formula

The R&A enacted the 1.62 formula after World War I. The formula meant that the ball must be a maximum weight of 1.62 ounces (45.93 grams) and a minimum diameter of 1.62 inches (4.11 cm).

A ball 1.68 inches in diameter and weighing 1.55 ounces was tried by the USGA for two years. But, in 1932, it reverted to a weight of 1.62 ounces and a diameter of 1.68 inches.

Early clubs


The early specimen of golf club came to spotlight in 1970 during the excavation of the Dutch East Indiaman Kennemerland when it sunk in 1664. Previously the oldest clubs were discovered in Hull, England, with a newspaper with a date of 1741.

There are early specimens in the British Golf Museum at St. Andrews.

The clubs include two woods and a putting cleek, which is a putter with an iron head on a wooden shaft. The putter was made in the second half of the 18 century by Simon Cossar of Leith, who was a club maker for the Company of Gentlemen Golfers.

Allan Robertson, a member of R&A, made cleek for steady putting. After he realized that the gutta-percha ball did not ruin golf, he also realized the value of iron with approach shots.

"Young Tom" the son Tom Morris created an idea for the cup-faced niblick, which is the nine iron today for playing the shorter distance and approaches.

Golf Courses


A round of golf consists of 18 holes, which is available on most golf courses. However, some golf courses have nine holes. In a stipulated round, the golfer plays them twice. Golf courses usually measure from 6000 to 7000 yards and individual holes range from 150 to 600 yards.

The golf game requires play of the ball from tee to hole by continuous strokes according to the rules. The design of the golf accommodates for the different positions of the ball. The objective of the game is to make the fewest strokes.

During the early 19th century, there was no requirement for the number of holes. The number of holes required varied with the localities.

When Leith, with five holes, popularity drop. St. Andrews became a popular hub. In 1764, St. Andrews round was modified to 18 holes.

Golf clubs


In the average player golf set, there are either 9 or 10 iron and 3 or 4 wood golf club. During a round, no more than 14 clubs are allowed. All the clubs are different in some way, and no two are alike. They have different length, weight and size. The shape of the head, the angle of the shaft-end and the angle of the face of the club are also different.

The number and the name designate each golf club. The number identifies the length and pitch. It also determines the height and distance of the club will drive a ball.

Typically, the greater the distance, the lower the number The distance decreases and pitch increases as golf club numbers go up. For longer distances, generally, woods or metal are used. Golf clubs include the following woods, irons and putter.

Woods:

-number 1 (driver)
-number 2 (brassie)
-number 3 (spoon)
-number 4 (baffy)
-number 5 (replaces number 3 or 4 iron)

Irons:

-number 1 (driving iron)
-number 2 (midiron)
-number 3 (mid-mashie)
-number 4 (mashie iron)
-number 5 (mashie)
-number 6 (spade mashie)
-number 7 (mashie-niblick)
-number 8 (pitching niblick)
-number 9 (niblick)
-number 10 (wedge)
-putter (carries no number).

Tournaments

There are four prestigious men's major championship. They are the Masters, the U.S. Open, The Open Championship and the PGA Championship.

The top golfers play in these tournaments from around the world. Since its inception, the Master is played at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. The Master is the only tournament played on the same course every year.

The PGA Championship and the U.S. Open are played a different course around the U.S. The Open Championship is played at courses around the United Kingdom. Before The Masters and the PGA Championship, the four Majors were the Open Championship, the U.S. Open and the U.S. Amateur.

History Of Golf

History of Golf

The first step to becoming a pro golfer is to know and master your tools. Even without the dream to go pro, you still need to have a good understanding of how golf clubs work. You can’t just take one and swing. Well, you can but you probably won’t get the ball in the hole.

Golf is a game of precision. Aside from just working on your swing, you must ALSO know which club you need to use. No matter how hard you hit the nail, it probably won’t be effective if you use a shovel when you should be using a hammer. In the same way, this guide will help you through identifying the different parts and types of golf clubs and when to use them. We’ll also be diving into what happens as your club hits the ball to help you understand how the energy from your swing is transferred to the ball.

Chapter 1

Origins

The origin of golf is very challenging to decipher when looking at each region history. The description of the golf game makes it difficult to determine the exact history of golf.

Many describe the golf game as a ball-and-stick type sport. This type of sports dates back to the 2600 B.C. era. Listed below are some of the mentions of the ball-and-stick games.

2600 BC Egypt: A ball-and-stick type sport was mention in 2600 BC in Middle Egypt. There are images of players on the tomb of Kehti Beni Hasan. The Greeks, most likely adopted game from the Egyptians.

100 BC: The Romans developed an early form of golf called Paganica. The game consisted of a stuffed leather ball and a bent wooden stick. The balls were larger, and they range in size from five to five and a half inches in diameter. The object of the game was to hit a target, which could be either tree, a rock or something else. Two teams played in the opposite direction, similar to hockey.

960-1279: Chuíw án is a similar game to golf. The Chinese played the game at several clubs during the Song Dynasty.

1261: Jacob van Mae Maerlant, a Flemish poet, mention the game of kolf (golf) in the dutch manuscript in 1261. This was the earliest mention of the game in the Dutch language. Kolf was very popular in Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg.

1297: The Dutch played the game with a stick and leather ball in Loenen. The object of the game is to put the ball in a hole using golf clubs. The winner is the person with fewer strokes to the spot a few hundred yards in the distance.

1360: Brussels council banned the game of golf/colf. If anyone played, there would be a fine or the confiscation of an overcoat.

The Modern game (the big debate, Scottish or not?)


Scotland is known as the home of golf, and it is seen worldwide as the national cultural icon of Scotland. The modern-day game of hitting a small ball with a stick around a course of 18 holes is a Scotland origin.

However, there are reports the game originated elsewhere. They believed there was a golf-like game played in continental Europe. Many scholars argue that the game originated in 17th-century Netherlands and that this time frame predates the game in Scotland.

Scholars argue the word golf was thought to be an alternate word for 'colf,' which is a Dutch term meaning stick or club. The Dutch version of the game related to a game where the lowest number of strokes need to hit a ball with a mallet into a hole determines the winner.

Early golf in Scotland

Most modern sports have origins in earlier games that goes back thousands of years. Golf is no different. Like most recent games, golf developed into a recognizable version.

Golf differs from other sports in that the origins lie in the stick-and-ball games of ancient times. The modern game dates back as far as the 1400s in Scotland.

The 1457 Act, which prohibited golf, of the Scottish Parliament documented golf in Scotland. King James II prohibited golf because he believed the popularity of the sport was a distraction from military training.

In the 1500s, however, King James IV became captivated with the sport. When there was a short term of peace, King James IV engaged in the sports and allowed others to do so.

There is proof that expatriates, immigrant and Scottish soldiers took the sport to the British colonies during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Chapter 2

Associations Develop

By the end of the 1800s, golf popularity increased in the U.S. Golf popularity led to a need for an organizing body. In1894, delegates from the area golf clubs met to form a golf organization. The delegates represented Yonkers New York, Southampton New York, Brookline Massachusetts Chicago and Newport Rhode Island.

In 1894, the United States Golf Association (USGA), which is a governing body, was created in New York. The governing body is for the U.S. and Mexico national association of clubs, facilities and golf courses. It establishes rules for the game and administers the golf championship.

There are five charter member the USGA, and they are:

-St. Andrew Golf Club of Yonkers, New York
-Newport (Rhode Island) Golf Club
-Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Southampton, New York
-The Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts
-Chicago Golf Club in Wheaton, Illinois.

USGA serves as a referee for rules, questions and general information on amateur status. In 1916, the USGA changed the name to Professional Golf Association of America (PGA).

Both professionals and amateurs are now allowed to play in the British Open, and the U.S. Open. However, they are not allowed to play in the Accenture Match Play Championship, the Arnold Palmer Invitational and the Golf Championships.

The Ruling Authority (R&A), which is the ruling authority of golf throughout the world except for U.S. and Mexico and the USGA interprets and makes the rules of golf. The USGA does the following:

-Provides national handicap
-Conducts 14 national championships
-Test golf equipment for adherence to regulations

Britain


In ancient times, golf originated as the stick and ball game of the sport that's played today. Golf dates back to the 1400s in Britain.

When James VI of Scotland took the throne in England in 1603, he and his court played golf at the Blackheath course in London. 

Mary, the Queen of Scots and the ruling class, contributed to the rise of the sports. 

Queen Mary played golf often, and her students carried her clubs, whom she called cadet. Many believe that the word cadet is the origin of the word caddie.

In the 1600s, James I lifted the ban on playing golf on Sunday. He also appointed the official golf clubs and golf ball makers.

James II arranged the first international match between Scotland and England. The game of golf slowly became popular outside of Scotland. However, there were several notable courses outside of Scotland.

In the early 1770s, British slave traders built the first African golf course on Bunce Island in Sierra Leone. Below are notables reminders of the oldest golf clubs and golf excursion outside of the British Isles.

-In 1844 the Mauritius Gymkhana Club was built

-1829, the Royal Calcutta Golf Club

-1856 the Pau (the oldest golf course in continental Europe_.

Golf became widely popular in the 19th century outside of Scotland.

The United States and Canada

A vast majority of the nineteenth centuries golf had a difficult time gaining popularity in the U.S. The nation at the time was busy building rebuilding itself after the Civil War. When America found time for sports, it was horseracing, baseball and boxing.


However, there is evidence of golf in America during the 17th century. For example, in 1650, a group of men played golf for points near Fort Orange (Albany New York). And, in 1657, a group of men were cited and warned not to play golf, and in 1659, an ordinance was issued to prevent golf in Albany New York, because of broken windows.

In the 1800s golf thrive in the United Kingdom. However, it slowly began to spread outside the shores of Britain. The U.S. was slowly catching on to golf craze.

In 1873, Canada Royal Montreal Club was the first golf club in North America. The club members played on Dixie (formerly known as Fletcher Field). The name Dixie derived from Southern refugees of the U.S. Civil War. Golf was also played in 1876 at the Niagara and Toronto, Ontario clubs, and in 1879 in the Brantford, Ontario club.

Golf arrived at the tail end of the 18th century mostly in the northeastern part of the United States. The U.S. built the first golf club 15 years after the Canada Royal Montreal Club. In 1888, John Reid, a transplanted Scot, ordered a set of clubs from Tom Morris in St Andrews.

He gathered together a small group of his friends and set out to a three-hole course in the cow pastures of Yonkers, New York. After playing with his friends, the group formed the St. Andrew Club of Yonkers, which is the first golf club in America.

In 1889, a group of Englishmen built the Middlesbrough Golf Club. In 1894, there were a total of nine golf courses in the U.S. Chicago had the first golf course on the coast and the U.S. first 18-hole golf course. Chicago became a popular location for golf because of its 26 golf courses.

Chapter 3

Rules of Golf


In 1744, a small group of gentlemen golfers came together and formed a group called the honourable company of Edinburgh golfers. They are believed to be the oldest golf clubs in the world. In 1754, when the Society of St Andrews came up with the Saint Andrew code, the Honourable company drew up their own set of rules for golf. They framed 13 rules.

The first rule state that your ball must be teed within a club-length of the hole and your tee must be on the ground. The ball that is struck must not be changed, and the ball must be removed from water or water hazard. If you remove it, you must per permit rival a stroke.

Representatives from the British Unions Advisory Committee, the United States, Commonwealth and the European Golf Federation have co-opted to consolidate the codes. At various times the U.S. and Britain have decided to have separate codes. However, in 1967, a uniform code took effect.

The R&A and the USGA are golf rule-making bodies. Their goals were to provide uniformity in the rules of golf by analyzing views, recommendation and interpretation for revisions.

The golfers in St. Andrews established the R&A and embraced the rules of the Leith. Periodical changes were made before R&A was framed to turn the last position in 1897.

Equipment Develops


The allowance of a variety of iron heads is the most notable factor in golf. The introduction of the steel shaft began in the late 1890s, but the governing bodies of golf were slow to adopt them.

In the 1970s, there was a shift in shaft technology for strength characteristics and lightweight. Graphite shaft filled the role with both traits.In the 1980s, metal with its strength and versatility replaced wood.

New golf clubs employ graphite and lightweight titanium heads to increase the size of the clubhead. Modern material strength increases the distance the ball can travel by increasing the spring-like effect of the club. The new materials also allow a much thinner face of the club.

To maintain the challenge of the game, the USGA limited the spring-like effect to .83 and the maximum clubhead size to 460 ccs. The spring-like effect is known as the Coefficient of Restitution.

Golf Balls


For regulation golf balls, the maximum weight of 1.62 ounces and a minimum diameter of 1.6 ounces. The competition velocity of the ball should not exceed 250 ft. However, Britain does require a velocity specification.

The early golf ball


The golf balls made between 14th and 17th centuries composed of hard wood, such as Beach and box trees. In Scotland, however, the balls were filled with cows hair imported from the Netherland.

Feather Era


Later, the feathery ball came to light with a unique process. The feathery cover is a hand-sewn round leather pouch stuff with goose or chicken feathers and coated with white paint. The volume of the feathers should be a top hat full of feathers. The feathers were softened, boiled and stuffed into the leather pouch.

Gutta-percha (gutty)


In 1848, the emergence of the Gutta-percha revolutionized the game.

Dr. Robert Adams Patterson invented Gutta-percha (gutty) ball. Gutta-percha, a milky-like dried sap of the Malaysian sapodilla tree, has a softness and rubber-like feel of the sap. The sap can be heated and shaped in a mold. The sap becomes impressible and soft at boiling temperature. When it cools, it becomes brittle and retains its shape. Cold water does not affect the sap.

In the 1840s, it came to light that the properties of the gutta-percha were ideal for the manufacture of golf balls. The simple process of boiling the sap, molding it and allowing it to dry was efficient in manufacturing of golf balls.

Not only was the sap quickly to manufacture, but it was also cheaper to produce. During the manufacturing process, if a ball was damaged or not perfectly rounded, it could be quickly reformed.

By accident, the damage balls with nick and cuts actually provided a more consistent ball flight than the ball with a perfectly smooth surface.

The manufacturer started intentionally making the indentations on the surface of the new balls using a hammer, or a knife or chisel gave the guddy textured surface. The new protruding knobs left by carvings patterns across the ball surface became known as brambles due to the resemble of the Bramble fruit.

Rubber Ball


In 1903, the Spalding company launched a new ball, which covered with bladder, a natural rubber. The bladder ball is easier to control than the gutta-percha and more durable. The balls with indentations produced better results than the balls with bumps. They also reduced the drag on the ball by increasing turbulence.

 In 1899, George F Grant, one of the first African-American golfers, increase the playability and popularity of golf by introducing the golf tee. 

Grant's invention also increased the average player's opportunity of getting the ball airborne. Players previously made a tee from a pinch of wet dirt or used early tees made from rubber, steel or cardboard.

The 1.62 formula

The R&A enacted the 1.62 formula after World War I. The formula meant that the ball must be a maximum weight of 1.62 ounces (45.93 grams) and a minimum diameter of 1.62 inches (4.11 cm).

A ball 1.68 inches in diameter and weighing 1.55 ounces was tried by the USGA for two years. But, in 1932, it reverted to a weight of 1.62 ounces and a diameter of 1.68 inches.

Early clubs


The early specimen of golf club came to spotlight in 1970 during the excavation of the Dutch East Indiaman Kennemerland when it sunk in 1664. Previously the oldest clubs were discovered in Hull, England, with a newspaper with a date of 1741.

There are early specimens in the British Golf Museum at St. Andrews.

The clubs include two woods and a putting cleek, which is a putter with an iron head on a wooden shaft. The putter was made in the second half of the 18 century by Simon Cossar of Leith, who was a club maker for the Company of Gentlemen Golfers.

Allan Robertson, a member of R&A, made cleek for steady putting. After he realized that the gutta-percha ball did not ruin golf, he also realized the value of iron with approach shots.

"Young Tom" the son Tom Morris created an idea for the cup-faced niblick, which is the nine iron today for playing the shorter distance and approaches.

Golf Courses


A round of golf consists of 18 holes, which is available on most golf courses. However, some golf courses have nine holes. In a stipulated round, the golfer plays them twice. Golf courses usually measure from 6000 to 7000 yards and individual holes range from 150 to 600 yards.

The golf game requires play of the ball from tee to hole by continuous strokes according to the rules. The design of the golf accommodates for the different positions of the ball. The objective of the game is to make the fewest strokes.

During the early 19th century, there was no requirement for the number of holes. The number of holes required varied with the localities.

When Leith, with five holes, popularity drop. St. Andrews became a popular hub. In 1764, St. Andrews round was modified to 18 holes.

Golf clubs


In the average player golf set, there are either 9 or 10 iron and 3 or 4 wood golf club. During a round, no more than 14 clubs are allowed. All the clubs are different in some way, and no two are alike. They have different length, weight and size. The shape of the head, the angle of the shaft-end and the angle of the face of the club are also different.

The number and the name designate each golf club. The number identifies the length and pitch. It also determines the height and distance of the club will drive a ball.

Typically, the greater the distance, the lower the number The distance decreases and pitch increases as golf club numbers go up. For longer distances, generally, woods or metal are used. Golf clubs include the following woods, irons and putter.

Woods:

-number 1 (driver)
-number 2 (brassie)
-number 3 (spoon)
-number 4 (baffy)
-number 5 (replaces number 3 or 4 iron)

Irons:

-number 1 (driving iron)
-number 2 (midiron)
-number 3 (mid-mashie)
-number 4 (mashie iron)
-number 5 (mashie)
-number 6 (spade mashie)
-number 7 (mashie-niblick)
-number 8 (pitching niblick)
-number 9 (niblick)
-number 10 (wedge)
-putter (carries no number).

Tournaments

There are four prestigious men's major championship. They are the Masters, the U.S. Open, The Open Championship and the PGA Championship.

The top golfers play in these tournaments from around the world. Since its inception, the Master is played at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. The Master is the only tournament played on the same course every year.

The PGA Championship and the U.S. Open are played a different course around the U.S. The Open Championship is played at courses around the United Kingdom. Before The Masters and the PGA Championship, the four Majors were the Open Championship, the U.S. Open and the U.S. Amateur.

How Golf Clubs Work

How Golf Clubs Work

The first step to becoming a pro golfer is to know and master your tools. Even without the dream to go pro, you still need to have a good understanding of how golf clubs work. You can’t just take one and swing. Well, you can but you probably won’t get the ball in the hole.

Golf is a game of precision. Aside from just working on your swing, you must ALSO know which club you need to use. No matter how hard you hit the nail, it probably won’t be effective if you use a shovel when you should be using a hammer. In the same way, this guide will help you through identifying the different parts and types of golf clubs and when to use them. We’ll also be diving into what happens as your club hits the ball to help you understand how the energy from your swing is transferred to the ball.

Chapter 1

Golf Club Parts

The golf club is your main tool in this game. There are many different types of golf clubs, each type with a specific purpose, but they all have the same general parts. From the top to the bottom, you have the Grip, Shaft, and Head.

Grip


The Grip is the part of the golf club that you hold. Now, a majority of golf clubs have a rubber grip which can range from being firm to soft. Other materials used are synthetic polymer blends, cords, and leathers; with leather grips being the only material used in the earlier years of golf. Grip selection is dependent on your needs. As a beginner, a standard rubber grip should be enough for you to have a firm hold.

Aside from the type of material, grips also have different sizes. A standard size grip would suit most golfers but, depending on your style, you might prefer a larger or smaller grip. The smallest size is for hands that are shorter than 7 inches. The way to measure the length of your hand is to start from the center of the base of your hand, where your palm meets your wrist, all the way to the tip of your middle finger.

The smallest grip size is known as a junior grip. Standard grips are for hands that are 7 to 8 ¾ inches long. Midsize grips are for hands 8 ¼ to 9 ¼ inches while the largest Jumbo grips are for hands larger than that. For people with even larger hands or those who just prepare oversized grips, you can use tape to extend it.

Shaft


Extending from the grip and carrying the head is the shaft. Different golf clubs vary in shaft length and the shape of the club’s head. You’ll find that common materials used are either steel or carbon-fiber compound.

Other materials that are now being used are graphite, titanium, and nano fuse which is a crystalline alloy with a carbon composite sublayer. The type of material that makes your shaft can affect how your swing might feel. These materials relay energy and vibrations differently so if you are used to using a club with a steel shaft, you’ll feel a different kind of impact when you use a graphite club.

  • Flex Rating

Shafts also have a flex rating. A flex rating is basically the measure of the shaft’s stiffness. The rating ranges from Ladies (L), Seniors (A), Regular (R), Firm (F), Extra Firm (X), and Stiff (S) with L being the least stiff, allowing the most bend during a swing.

A pro would ideally prefer a stiff shaft since it would provide better control and relay the most energy from an effective swing. However, a beginner would benefit more from a limp L or A rated shaft, which could provide an extra whip-like motion, relaying stored potential energy to the ball.

Head


The head is where you will see the most variety between golf clubs. The different types of golf clubs are divided depending on the shape of the head. The head may seem to be the smallest part of the golf club but variations in its design play a crucial part in how the club is best used.

Parts of the Head


The head is further divided into parts: the Hosel, Face, Sole, and Back. The Hosel is the part that connects to the shaft. The face is the part that will hit the ball. The part behind the face is known as the back.On the face of the head, you’ll find the toe, heel, and sole. The toe is the part that is furthest away from you, while the heel is the one closest. The sole is the lowest part which is closest to the ground.

Loft


The loft refers to the angle face of the head is tilted away from the perpendicular axis of the shaft when you stand it on the ground. You’ll need the right tools to measure the exact loft of a golf club. A higher loft would have a more angled or horizontal face while lower lofted club faces will look more vertically oriented.

The loft, also referred to as the slope of the face, can determine your strike’s trajectory and distance. A club with a lower loft, such as a Driver, would cause the ball to move at a lower trajectory but travel a longer distance which is why a Driver is used at the tee where getting a wider coverage is a priority. Drivers have the lowest loft degree.

Higher lofted clubs, such as irons and wedges, are for shorter distance shots. The higher angles on wedges are extremely useful because they give golfers better control. A commonly used wedge is the Sand Wedge which, from its namesake, is often used to bring the ball up in the air and out of sand bunkers.

Grooves


The grooves on the face of the golf club prevents the ball from skidding. It keeps a firm grip on the ball even when there are droplets or bits of grass that could get caught between the ball and face during impact.

For example, when there is moisture that gets caught in the swing, the droplets of water can enter into the grooves while the face impacts the ball. If there were no grooves, the water would affect the shot and cause the ball to either go in another direction or slip off.

Chapter 2

Types of Golf Clubs

Identifying the different types of Golf Clubs: When to use...


A recommended set of golf clubs would include 3 woods, 7 irons, 1 hybrid, a putter, and 2 wedges of your choice. This is not a requirement, but it is a good variety of clubs to complete your set of 14. 

Each golfer is allowed their pick of 14 clubs. Most would opt to have a larger selection of irons, wedges, and putters. The reasoning behind this will be clearer after we discuss the different types of golf clubs.

Woods


Originally, woods were golf clubs with large heads made from wood. While the name has remained, these golf clubs now have heads made from metals. A major advantage in the manufacturing of metal golf clubs is the liberties that manufacturers have in terms of design. With metals, they are able to mold the head to its best design.

There are many things to take into consideration with golf clubs with large heads. A heavier club head is good for stability when taking your swing because it prevents twisting. A slight twist as you swing would change the direction of the ball. However, light heads allow you to put more power and speed into your swing, relaying more energy into the ball causing it to travel further. Now, most golf heads are hollow because this places the weight of the head along the perimeter. A hollow head is better designed to prevent twisting than one with the weight in the center.

With a hollow center, the head can also be made larger, creating a wider surface area to hit the ball with. Remember that precision is key when playing golf, so the larger area gives you a better chance to strike the ball.

The golf club with the biggest head, lowest loft, and longest shaft is the Driver. Drivers are used at the tee because the design is best suited for driving the ball to a distance, bringing it as close as possible to the hole. The Driver is also best used at the tee because its large size makes it difficult to strike the ball when it is on the ground. Following the Driver in head size, and with a higher loft degree are the Fairway woods. They are so named because they are usually used when on the fairway.

Irons


Just as the woods were originally named because they were made from wood, irons were the first golf clubs that were made of metals; Iron to be exact. Unlike woods, irons are characterized as having higher loft degrees. 

This means their faces are more angled, making them best suited for taking shots that are less than 200 yards away. You can easily identify irons by the shorter shaft and smaller clubheads. Grooves on irons may sometimes be more prominent.

There are 2 types of irons. First is the Muscle Back, also known as the “Blade Style” Iron. The second is the Cavity Back Style. The main difference between the two is the presence of a full back behind the face of the former while the latter has a hollow back.

Muscle Backs are often preferred by more skilled players. Also known as Full Back Irons, the presence of the weight gives it a higher center of gravity. This means that using a full back would give a lower trajectory shot as compared to a hollowed-out Cavity Back iron. On the other hand, the hollowed back of Cavity Back irons gives it better perimeter weighting, making it easier for players to hit the ball.

  • Sub-type: Wedges

Wedges can be identified as either a subset or irons or a whole other set of golf clubs. These are the golf clubs that have the shortest shaft lengths and the highest loft degrees. When you look at the pros, most carry 3 to 4 wedges. From the lowest to highest loft, you have the Pitching Wedge (PW), Approach Wedge (AW), Sand Wedge (SW), Lob Wedge (LW).

Maintaining the same rule, the higher lofted Lob Wedge (LW) can give you a higher trajectory but shorter distance to your shot. Propelling the ball higher may not be important when you are at the tee, but it is useful for when you get stuck in a bunker or are on a steep hill.

Putters


The main purpose of the putter is to putt the ball into the hole. You will find many variations on the putter head but we can classify that into either traditional blades, heel-toe head, and mallet putters.

The traditional blades are narrow blades where you can find the shaft supporting the blade at the heel. These are the putters that carry some similarity with hockey blades. The heel-toe heads are similar but carry some weight at the heel and toe areas. Instead of being a narrow blade, it will have thicker edges. Lastly, the mallet putters are those with larger heads.

There are many different styles and shapes to putters because putting is dependent on the golfer’s preferences. The best way to identify which one works for you is to test them out.

Hybrids


Wedges and Putters are more specialized golf clubs. Hybrids are the clubs that carry characteristics of the other 2 types discussed earlier: Woods and Irons.

 Long irons, which are those with the lower loft and longer shafts are now opted out in favor of hybrids. Because of the design of those long irons, hitting the ball can be difficult. Thus, hybrids which retain the lofts of irons but the bigger heads of woods can give golfers a “best-of-both-worlds” advantage.

Chapter 3

Golf Club Numbers Meaning

Reading Numbers: What do golf club numbers mean?


When choosing golf clubs, there are more things to worry about than just picking out whether you need a wood or an iron. Woods and irons are numbered to identify the loft and shaft length. 

With each increasing number denoting a higher loft and a shorter shaft. For example, a 1-Wood, which is commonly known as the Driver, has the lowest loft and the longest shaft. A 2-Wood would have a higher loft, and a shorter shaft. The same applies when comparing Irons.

Long irons are the 1-,2-,3-,4- irons, that have higher lofts than fairway woods, which are most commonly the 3- and 5- woods but have longer shafts when compared to other irons. Wedges and Putters don’t follow the same numbering system because Wedges are already divided into types based on the loft degrees, while putters vary in the general shape of the head and not the loft.

Club-to-Ball: What happens when you swing

The actual contact time between the ball and the golf club is 450 microseconds. When that happens, the ball undergoes 4 phases. Initially, the club presses up against the ball, causing the impacted side to flatten. During this phase, the ball looks like the letter D. Next, 2 things happen: the ball returns to its original shape and it starts to move up across the face of the club head. The third phase involves the ball stretching forward. During this phase, the ball elongates and starts to spin as it moves forward. Lastly, the ball leaves the face of the club and bounds forward. Hopefully, straight into the hole.

Prior to that, you and every other golfer, take the time to get your stance ready, position your feet, straighten your back and ready your aim. The goal is to focus your energy and direct it into the ball. The impact between club and ball is the culmination of your stroke, but the outcome is largely dependent on more than just your technique.

The stiffness of the shaft of your golf club would affect how the energy of your stroke is related to the ball. The length of the shaft would change your stroke dynamic. The type of golf club you use, specifically the head shape and loft would change how the ball will move forward. Whether it will move higher up in the air or have a lower trajectory to cover more distance.

Conclusion


Aside from your skill and your equipment, there are other things that will affect the game. Some of these things are beyond your control, such as the wind direction. Regardless, your technique is critically important in the sport. Pros aren’t pros because they have the best and most expensive equipment. They have a combination of skill and the right tools. They know how to hit the ball and they know which club to use when they need it. 

However, it is fair to note that manufacturers have made it easy for beginners to enjoy the game. There are golf clubs available that are ideal to make golf more friendly for those without Tiger Woods’ skills. 

Putting Tips

Putting Tips

One of the hardest aspects of playing golf, is to change the speed with which you strike the ball in the beginning of the game to the one you use during putting. When you start the game you need to use a lot of speed so that the ball advances the greatest distance possible. However, by the time you get to the green, you have to learn how to calm down and strike the ball steadily so that it enters the hole.

Putting is a very important part of this sport because it can require more strikes than you could initially expect. Usually the green has a slope which is needed so that the water drains when it is raining. It is not always clear what orientation or how pronounced the slope is. If you add to this the resistance created by the orientation of the grass, it can be a very complicated part of the game.

Putting is a very personal part of playing golf. It is so personal that a lot of different types of putters have been designed in order to adapt to the different requirements of the players. Some people believe that putting correctly is all about intuition the feeling. In the end, the key to putting is practice, repeating the concepts and really good drills. No matter how well you can putt, you can always get better. These next putting tips are a collection of the best advices given by experts in the Internet.

Chapter 1

Putting Basics

The Left Hand Guides the Putter

One of the hardest parts of putting is controlling the trajectory of the ball inside the green. Your right hand is used for the strength of the strike. The left hand guides the putter. Hold the grip with your left hand in a steady position that guarantees you will have perfect control of its direction. 


If you align your left hand's lifeline with the grip you will have the same angle between your forearm and the putter always. The shaft should look like an extension of your forearm. This will give you better control of the strike.

Hold the Putter Using Your Fingers

Holding the putter with your fingers, will give you better control of its movement. The arm has the strongest muscles near the shoulder and the weakest tendons in the fingers. Since fingers are great for dexterity and putting has to do with precision, they have to be a part of the process. Your right hand has to hold the grip with emphasis on the fingers to release the strength and focus on direction.

Chapter 2

Proper Position

Separation of the feet

The separation of your feet can affect how well you putt. If you separate your feet too much, you are in a potion that prepares you for rapid movement. This is not the case in putting. While it is not wrong to separate your feet too much, it is preferred to separate them just a little bit (about one feet apart) and slightly bend your knees.


Keep Putter at a Constant Distance

Keep the distance of the clubface and your chest constant. If you move your putter near you or far away from you by folding your elbows, you will have many inconsistency problems. By keeping a constant distance you can have a better control of your stroke. Your elbows should be half bent and remain like that at all times during the stroke.

Tilt Your Upper Body

Tilt your upper body forward a little bit so that you don't have to twist a lot for the strike. That way you will have a more natural and stable stroke. Your eyes should be on top of the ball and your hands should be more or less under your shoulders.

Rotate Your Shoulders

Some golfers like to move their wrists when they are putting. That is fine, if it works for them. However, if you strike the ball by rotating your shoulders, and keeping your arms close to your sides at all times, you will have greater control on the direction of the ball. The rotation of your shoulders should be minimum because you are not striking the ball hard.


It is important not to move your knees or your hips during the strokes because you would loose control of the ball. In order to control the degree of rotation required and the balance of your body for the stroke, practice putting by standing only on your left foot. When you do this, try to
stand still throughout the entire swing (don't move your weight to your right foot).

Do Not Move Your Wrists

In order to keep control of the stroke, your wrist should not move. The shaft should be tilted a little bit towards the ball, but it is barely noticeable. Your arms and the putter should move like a single object. Practice your strokes by placing a golf ball between your right wrist and your putter's grip. Try to strike without dropping the ball.

Chapter 3

Stroke Technique

Strike Using the Central Part of the Clubface

If you hit the ball with the central part of the clubface, you will have better control of its direction and speed. When you practice, you can place two sticky objects on the clubface to frame the center. If the ball did not hit the center, it will get pasted and it will get nowhere.



There is a method to find the exact place of the clubface where you should hit the ball. If you hold your putter vertically, from the middle of the shaft, and tap the clubface with your other hand, there will be a point where the clubface will stop twisting and move straight backwards. That is the best place where you should hit the ball because it will give you very goodcontrol of the ball's trajectory. It is somewhere in the center of the clubface, but in some specific putters it may move a little to one side.

Keep Consistent Speed On Your Stroke

The putter should hit the ball at a constant speed. If it is accelerating or decelerating during the strike, you will have less control of the ball's speed. In order to strike the ball with a constant movement, first calculate the direction of the strike. Next you move the putter backwards and
pause for one or two seconds. Finally you let the putter fall like a pendulum. This simplifies the process of putting.

Use a Putter that Matches Your Type of Stroke

There are several types of common strokes. You should use a putter that matches the shape of your stroke. If you have a straight stroke, you will perform better with a balanced putter. If your stroke has the shape of an arch, you will do better with a putter that has a toe hang.

Chapter 4

Control Mastery

Don't Look at the Ball Moving

Do not look at the ball while it advances towards the hole. This can make you twist your hip and that can ruin the last part of your stroke. There are golf players that only hear the ball go in the hole (and never look at it moving). If you have to look at the ball, twist your neck (but never your hip).


Don't Look at the Ball for Too Long

If you look at the ball for a long period of time, there will come a point in which your brain will get locked. Focus on rolling the ball on top of the spot between the ball and the hole. This will help define the direction that it needs. The best tip for putting is do not force yourself too much. I you think too much about how to hit the ball, chances are you will do it poorly. Relax, keep it simple, and be a little careless. Don't get very nervous because that could make you miss the hole. Looking at the ball for too long can be the result of this nervousness.

The Ball Should Roll to the Hole

You will have better control of the ball's direction if you roll it through the green. You should avoid hitting the ball too hard, lifting it from the green, or making it bounce on the green. The type of strike you require here is more about precision. Place your putter vertically just before
it hits the ball. And align the central part of your body with the putter. Some people believe that at this point you should strike the ball tilting the putter's shaft very slightly towards the ball so that you hit the top part of the ball and make it roll over the green.

Length of a Putting Stroke

When you are putting, the length of the backstroke does not match the length of the forward stroke. This could lead to pushing the ball with the putter instead of hitting it, which does not help in accuracy. If you use a 60% in the backstroke and a 40% in the forward stroke, you will achieve better results.

Practice to Control the Speed

Controlling speed is important because, despite the fact that you need a lot less speed in putting than in the first part of the game, some greens can be large and the difference of speed required for strokes of different distances can be hard to master. 

These are two exercises to control speed. In the first one, you need a fake target, which is a circle drawn on the green, or any flat round object that substitutes the hole. When you practice, aim at a fake target and try to make the ball pass it by a certain distance, like one or two feet. This will help you control your speed.

Another exercise is to align five balls, each tree feet apart. The hole has to be aligned with the balls and there must be a tee at about one foot behind the hole. Next you have to put each ball in the hole, but trying to give each ball enough speed to reach the tee behind the hole. You start with the closest ball and as you retreat from the hole you will need greater speed so that each ball reaches the hole. If you miss a shot, see if it reaches the tee (to check if the speed was the correct one). The interesting part of the exercise is to do this uphill, downhill, and from each side of the
slope of the green. It is a very complete exercise that allows you to manipulate the speed almost intuitively when you are playing in the green.

Practice Short Putts

Practice putting from a distance of three feet. That is a hard distance to get the ball in the hole. If you get to dominate that, you are going to be in good shape for the rest of the cases. Try this exercise by stroking from the four cardinal directions. If the green has a slope, you will practice this also.

Practice With Different Slopes

Sometimes greens have slight slopes. In these cases, when you strike the ball gravity pulls it downward creating a curved trajectory. Some people miss because of this. 

By practicing with different slopes, you can calculate how much the trajectory of the ball will be curved downwards and strike the ball upwards, just enough so that he ball enters the hole with the curved trajectory. If you retreat a long distance and lower yourself, you can see more clearly the slope of the green and make more precise calculations.

How to Read the Green

Reading the green means understanding the slope and the texture of the grass. First, look for the highest and the lowest part of the general terrain. The green's orientation might be related to that general slope. Then look for the places where the water would go if it rains and try to define that slope. Next, look at what happens with the balls of the other players as they play in the green and try to determine its slope. Next retreat and lower yourself trying to determine the slope of the green and see if all that information makes sense. Finally look at the direction in which the grain of the grass grows to determine how that will affect the break of the putt.

Plumb Technique to Calculate Slopes

If you want a precise calculation of the slope of the green and the direction to which you should aim your strike, use this technique. Place yourself in a straight line that includes the hole and the ball. Then hold your putter vertically and loosely from the top of the grip (allowing it to move like a pendulum). Using the eye that is opposite to the arm that is holding the putter, cover half of the ball with the bottom of the shaft. Since gravity will orient the putter to a vertical position, the side of the shaft where the hole appears will indicate where the lowest part of the slope is.

Also, if you drew a line from the hole perpendicular to the shaft, that intersection is the place where you should aim your strike. If you do so, gravity will curve the ball's trajectory towards the hole. This technique only works for flat, inclined plains. Practice this technique to get better in putting.

Practice With a Wedge

If you practice with a wedge, you will improve your skills enormously (with the putter it is too easy). The problem with the wedge is striking the ball in the correct place so that it stays rolling on the ground. The area for the strike is a lot smaller on the wedge. This method can really speed up your ability for putting. However, if it creates confusion, then don't use it.

Control the Toe and Heel of the Putter

During the swing, the toe of the putter always advances more than the heel of the putter. In order to control this, practice by striking two balls at once. Align the balls perpendicular to the trajectory to the hole, so that you hit both of them at the same time with one strike (one with the heel of the putter and the other one with the toe of the putter). Try to make both of them advance at the same speed. Practice this exercise regularly to have a more consistent and even stroke.

Practice Controlling the Direction of the Stroke

Don't only study how to move your arms to putt. Practice controlling the direction of the stroke. You can do this by placing the ball in a specific place on the green and placing two tees or golf balls that frame the line that marks the trajectory that the ball must follow in order to enter the hole. Remember that a difference of two degrees will make you miss the hole.

Conclusion

Putting is a very important part of golf because it can affect enormously the score. It requires different abilities than those used during the beginning of the game. It is one of those areas that golf players constantly want to master. As it turns out, it seems there is always something new to learn about putting. That is one of the fun things about golf, there is always something new to learn.

How To Play Golf

How To Play Golf

The Definitive Guide

In this guide, we’re going to teach you how to play golf.

We’ll also give you some pointers on what equipment you’ll need to get started, where you can play, how to golf effectively, and talk briefly through the basic rules.

We’ll discuss some of the challenges to kicking off your golfing journey, and address some of the common misconceptions around the sport, including the stereotype that financial status is a barrier to entry.

There’s no getting away from the fact that golf can be a difficult sport to master and can seem hard to understand at first glance; that’s why we’ve created this definitive guide…

Chapter 1

Understanding the Golf Industry

Before you get started with playing golf, you might want to know a little more information about the sport and what makes it so popular.

Though it may seem like quite an exclusive sport, it has an enormous following and also contributes significantly to the economy.


Here are some key statistics about golf:

  • 23.82 million golf participants annually
  • 144,024 boys enrolled in high school golf activities
  • 4.14 million registered golfers in Europe
  • 13 million TV viewership of The Masters’ tournament
  • $7.5 billion direct economic output of the golf industry in Florida alone

As you can see, the sport is vast and has far-reaching economic advantages.

There are countless jobs, vast amounts of revenue, and millions of lives that have been impacted by golf and its related industries.

Though golf is considered to be a small piece of the pie when compared to larger professional sports, it is by no means a small or uninfluential industry. Golf is becoming more and more common.

By learning to play golf, you are not in the minority.

You’re actually joining a traditional sport with a rich history; one that is growing in popularity by the day.

While you’re learning how to play golf, remember to keep all of these things in mind and savor the experience of participating in such a sport.

Chapter 2

Things to Remember Before You Start

Now that you know a little bit more about golf, you can start getting serious about playing.

We’re going to cover everything in detail; from what equipment you’ll require to get started, what the rules are, where you can play, and where you can find resources on improving your game.

But first, I want to emphasize a point that I think is vitally important to enjoying a long hobby or career in golf.


Here are some key statistics about golf:

  • 23.82 million golf participants annually
  • 144,024 boys enrolled in high school golf activities
  • 4.14 million registered golfers in Europe
  • 13 million TV viewership of The Masters’ tournament
  • $7.5 billion direct economic output of the golf industry in Florida alone

As you can see, the sport is vast and has far-reaching economic advantages.

There are countless jobs, vast amounts of revenue, and millions of lives that have been impacted by golf and its related industries.

Though golf is considered to be a small piece of the pie when compared to larger professional sports, it is by no means a small or uninfluential industry. Golf is becoming more and more common.

By learning to play golf, you are not in the minority.

You’re actually joining a traditional sport with a rich history; one that is growing in popularity by the day.

While you’re learning how to play golf, remember to keep all of these things in mind and savor the experience of participating in such a sport.

Chapter 3

The Beginner's Guide to Golfing Equipment

If you want to play golf, you’re inevitably going to need some equipment.

This comes as no shock, but what might come as a surprise is the price of golf gear.

But do not fear; not all golf equipment comes at an astronomical cost and there are some bargains to be had, providing you know where to look.


Golf has never been known as an accessible sport for those on a budget, but there are ways to get around spending thousands of dollars on equipment.

Before we go into ways to save money on golfing equipment, we need to determine exactly what we’ll be needing to form a respectable assortment of golf gear.

Don’t worry, we know the process of starting any new sport can be overwhelming, but we’ve compiled a user-friendly, beginner’s guide to understanding the golfing essentials.

While the most advanced golfers will most probably spend a significant amount of money on expensive equipment, this really doesn’t need to be the case for beginners or those who golf infrequently for fun.

The equipment that is most ideal for a beginner golfer doesn’t have to cost the world. It can be quality, and affordable.

By breaking down the minimum essential equipment, we’ve established a complete list of golf gear categories, allowing you to easily identify what you need to kick start your journey on the golfing scene.

Clubs

First up are clubs. Clubs are obviously vital to your golfing experience but are also perhaps the most complicated component of your equipment.

For a beginner, this can be a daunting task.

If you have no prior experience with choosing or purchasing golf clubs, we’ll give you all the info you need to make that perfect selection.

As a rule of thumb, a brand new set of clubs and a club bag would cost you well into the thousands of dollars.

However, you can attain a full set of clubs for well under that if you are savvy and informed.

We recommend that you purchase a cheaper complete set online.

Many online stores offer this more affordable option.

You can typically get a full set of golf clubs including headcovers and a golf bag for under $500.

If you’re starting out, we recommend that you try to find a set which includes at least a driver, a hybrid, 2 irons, a wedge, and a putter.

For a pro, these clubs will seem amateurish and unsuitable for their needs because they are not fully customized.

For a beginner, on the other hand, these package deals represent excellent value and allow newcomers to enjoy the sport, whilst remaining firmly within their budget.

Though these sets are usually very cheap when compared to more advanced clubs, that doesn’t mean they’re low-quality.

Now, some of them may be made of inferior materials due to the difference in cost, but they can certainly serve the same purpose.

These types of golf club sets will serve a beginner well and can be surprisingly effective on the green; providing huge value for money.

Most beginner sets include a driver, fairway wood, hybrid, several irons, putter, golf bag, and headcovers.

That’s a ton of value packed into a very affordable price, and the club selection is more than adequate for the beginner golfer to start getting a feel for striking the ball with different clubs.

If you want to keep an even tighter budget, there are other options…

Though we don’t really recommend it, you could get your clubs used from a resale store.

You can also find and purchase various golf clubs individually and piece together to create your set, one club at a time, by finding good deals across several days or weeks.

If you can manage this, that’s fantastic!

The reason that we don’t typically recommend it, is because you generally end up getting a wildly inconsistent grab bag of clubs that don’t match and this can interfere with the way you swing and feel your clubs.

It can also be incredibly time-consuming to try and track down all those clubs to construct a set from scratch.

While there are extremely frugal ways to acquire equipment, we recommend just making the minor initial investment in a good beginner set, which can be easily sourced online.

The prices are reasonable enough to justify and will save you a lot of time and effort.

Golf Balls

The next thing that you’re going to need is golf balls.

As the focus for the entire sport, it’s important that you have a good supply of these.

Sounds obvious, right?

Though you might think of golf balls as insignificant, you’d be surprised at how much they impact your game and individual performance.

For professionals, it’s always important to carefully select golf balls; meeting your exact specifications.

For beginners, in all honesty, it really doesn’t matter as much.

When making your choice of golf balls, you can more than get by with the cheaper alternatives; particularly while you’re still learning.

There’s simply no requirement at this stage in the game, to purchase the newest and most highest-tech balls, as they appear on the market.

If you have the urge to spend big on golf balls, just remember that, as a beginner, you will likely be losing a lot of them.

It’s not worth your money to invest heavily unless you are a capable and experienced professional.

When you’re looking for balls as a beginner, your focus should be on finding a ball that is affordable, but also something that will provide you with a quality surface to strike.

Some packs of golf balls can cost well over $50, but, for now, you’ll manage just fine with boxes that retail for less than $10.

Golf balls generally come in packs of 15 or 18, and a good target for cost-per-ball for a beginner is anywhere from 40 cents to $1.

By spending less on balls, you can reserve more money for your longer-term equipment, such as your bag and clubs: when you are ready for a higher quality ball, you can always upgrade.

If you don’t want to buy new balls, there are other options available to you…

You could always try to buy used golf balls from sports stores or your network of golfing family and friends, providing they’re suitable.

Again, we don’t recommend this route, but we do recognize that it may be a good choice for those with a limited budget.

The reason that we don’t necessarily endorse this is that generally, these golf balls are in very poor condition.

If you want to get a consistent feel for hitting a ball, one of the worst ways to do it is by using used golf balls.

They will have already been struck many times, and they likely won’t be in their original shape.

The surface will also likely be full of dirt and dings, which doesn’t provide you with the best surface to strike.

If your budget is very tight, however, and you’re just looking for something super basic to have some fun with, you can undoubtedly track down and purchase some used golf balls. They are generally very cheap so you won’t mind if you lose them.

Tees

Now that the more complicated pieces of golf gear are out of the way, we move on to a very simple piece of equipment that you’ll need to invest in – the tee.

The main factor affecting which tees you select to use will be your ideal tee height.

Your tee height will affect how well you can strike the ball.

It’s an underrated factor in your golfing success.

While some golfers neglect to pay attention to the significance of tee height, in the beginning, we would recommend that you establish your tee height right away and get the appropriate tees so that you can become more accustomed to your preferred height from the start.

If you are continually changing tees and tee height, it will be harder to settle into a groove as a golfer and find a stroke that works well for you. Luckily, tees are not a difficult or expensive thing to shop for.

They are very affordable, and while you have many options, each one is versatile. For beginners, it’s generally recommended that you opt for a very large tee since you can always adjust it by pushing it further into the ground.

The drawback to getting a very large tee is that they are unwieldy and take up more space in your bag. Not every golfer will be okay with handling these large tees and trying to fit them into their routine.

This might not be an issue at all for you, but it’s something to keep in mind when shopping for tees.

The process of selecting a tee height is one that’s determined by trial and error. That’s why you should start out with a large tee and adjust it as needed.

Once you have determined a tee height that allows you to get the ideal strike on a ball, you can purchase tees that are actually designed to sit at that height, and you can stop having to push them deeper in the ground to get the right height.

Generally, tees are incredibly affordable. You can buy almost any decent brand of tees in packages of 50 or more for less than $5 per package.

Tees will likely be the smallest upfront investment in learning to play golf, but keep in mind that it is a recurring cost because you will inevitably go through them pretty quickly.

Gloves

Gloves are arguably one of the most prominent symbols of golf today, and some professionals can pay upwards of hundreds – or even thousands – of dollars per set.

But, in reality, gloves should be a very basic (and inexpensive) part of your golfing ensemble; particularly for beginners. You can pick up a quality set of golfing gloves online for as little as $10.

They are designed primarily to improve your grip and subsequently, improve your overall swing.

It goes without saying, that achieving a good grip is important when trying master a consistent and powerful swing; if you can’t grip your club correctly, your shots will be skewed, and you’ll find yourself pulling or hooking balls much more often.

When shopping for gloves, it’s also important to consider comfort.

A comfortable pair of gloves will avoid the need to continually adjust due to itchiness or discomfort, and will generally improve your game.

Shoes

As you’ll be walking around in them for what could end up being many hours, it’s imperative that you find a durable, comfortable pair of shoes.

Trust me when I say; this is one thing that you definitely don’t want to skimp out on.

You should shop around and really do your research before you reach your decision on a pair of golf shoes.

They don’t just need to be comfortable, they also need to have a proper grip to provide you with a safe surface for stepping on when you find yourself in the bunker or in the rough.

A good name brand pair of golfing shoes will likely cost upwards of $100, but they are well worth the investment if you’re looking to take up golf as a hobby.

Chapter 4

Skill Development

Ok, let’s say you now have all the right equipment; chances are you want to jump right in and start playing golf.

But, before you take the plunge, there are a couple of things you should know before you tee off for the first time…


This may seem obvious, but it’s pretty important.

Learning the fundamentals – like hitting a golf ball – is crucial to your success and enjoyment when playing golf.

To start with, you’ll want to focus your attention on learning to swing with a driver, wood, iron, wedge, and putter.

And trust me when I say this; hitting a golf ball is now walk in the park. Particularly for those who have literally never done it before.

There are seasoned pros who still struggle with getting a consistent strike that puts them in the best situation to walk away with more birdies than bogeys (if you’re scratching your head at these terms, check out a recent post we did on golf terminology).

Lessons

One way to get ahead of the curve and accelerate your learning is by enrolling in golf lessons.

This might sound like the sort of thing that a teen does during the summer, but most of the time, adults are perfectly welcome in a golf lesson class, and you shouldn’t ever feel embarrassed about enlisting the help of one of these classes or signing up for one-to-one tuition.

It’s probably one of the best ways to learn and will reduce the number of bad habits you develop.

Generally, golf lessons are offered by local golfing professionals, golf stores, or country clubs. These lessons will give you the basics when it comes to swinging various types of clubs and striking the ball well, and the lessons will, of course, become more advanced as your skill level improves.

Driving Range

Another way to obtain some golfing experience is to head to your local driving range.

Aside from being a really fun day out for golfing enthusiasts, a driving range is a great way to learn how far you can hit the ball, how much power to use, and which way your balls tend to pull or hook.

A driving range is a great place to get some consequence-free swings in and really experiment and develop your swing.

For seasoned golfing professionals, it’s also a great way to tinker with, and improve your swing; particularly if you just want to make some adjustments or try some variations.

Home Practice

Though you may think your golf-practicing options are limited whilst you’re at home, there is one very important element to the game that can be enhanced without having to make a trip to the golf club; putting.

Putting is really easy to practice at home, even if you don’t want to purchase a dedicated putting machine.

All you need to do is set down a cup on your floor and putt away.

Don’t get me wrong; this isn’t a way to fine-tune your putting to a professional standard, but as a beginner, you can get a feel for your putter by doing this.

But if you prefer a more authentic feel, you can practice putting in your backyard; proving you’re ok with having a small hole dug out of your lawn, that is.

And if that’s not an option, you can always practice your swing.

No ball needed; just simply swing away.

And if your yard is big enough, try getting hold of some plastic balls. They’re no good for a live game but are perfect for practicing that swing.

These balls can be found almost anywhere online, and they’re very affordable. Simply buy a pack, go out to your backyard, and hit them around to work on your swing.

Chapter 5

The Rules of Golf

If you are planning on learning to play golf, you’re going to need to know the rules of the game.

And there are plenty…

But do not fear; from the basic to the incredibly complicated – we’ll talk you through it all.


The Basics

If you are very unfamiliar with golf as a sport, this section will be extremely useful to you.

We’re going to explain briefly, exactly how golf works.

Golf is a sport in which players compete as individuals.

Essentially, the objective is to putt your ball in any of the given course holes, in the least amount of shots; in essence, the fewer swings you take to putt, the better your score will be.

The player with the lowest overall score at the end of the round of golf wins the game.

Any form of contact with the ball in an effort to advance your play, or put it in a more favorable position is strictly forbidden unless, of course, you’re contacting the ball with the golf club.

Golf is played outdoors on a golf course, and a round of golf usually consists of either 9 or 18 holes.

Scoring

As previously mentioned, the general aim of golf is to score the fewest points; this is achieved by putting in the fewest amount of swings.

Now, before we move on, it’s probably worth noting here that each hole on a golf course has a pre-determined score attached to it, also known as par.

This score is determined by the game scorers, and it is based on the average number of strokes required to putt on any given hole, e.g. par-3 would be completed in 3 strokes on average.

Most holes are either par-3, par-4, or par-5.

Your performance on any given course hole, and throughout the game more generally, will be determined by how above or below par you are, e.g. are you completing the hole and putting your ball in fewer than average shots, or are you taking more than average?

If you finish a hole with fewer shots than par, you’re doing well and your score will be positively impacted. If this is the case, one of the below scores will be given:

  • Birdie – one shot below par
  • Eagle – two shots below par
  • Double eagle – three shots below par
  • Ace – the famous ‘hole-in-one’

If you finish a hole with the same number of pre-determined shots, e.g. par, your score would be ‘on-par’.

For example, if par on a given hole was 3 and you completed the hole in three stokes, you would finish that hole on par.

If however, you finish a hole with more shots than par, your score will be negatively affected, e.g. it will increase (remember, the aim of golf is to achieve the lowest possible score…)

If you do end up finishing below par, you’ll be given one of the below scores for that hole:

  • Bogey – one shot above par
  • Double bogey – two shots above par
  • Triple bogey – three shots above par

In summary…

Get the ball in the hole in as few shots as possible!

Chapter 6

Mastering Your Swing

Once you have all the preliminary knowledge that you need to get started, you’re going to want to start refining your skills and mastering your swing.

Taking the time to evaluate and improve your swing; giving you more control over your ball placement.

This will allow you to adjust your technique to suit any given hole.


The best way to learn how to swing a golf club effectively is by, well, swinging a golf club…

Practice makes perfect is a soundbite that certainly springs to mind!

But visual aids help too. This YouTube video will provide you with some top tips on how to strike the perfect drive, including how to keep it straight and on course.

This is one of the most common issues that beginner golfers face; hooking or pulling the ball happens to those who haven’t yet refined their swing.

Mastering your swing is about a lot more than just being able to hit a ball. It entails a total transformation in the way that you carry yourself while swinging and your whole-body posture.

When refining your swing, you need to analyze everything including your footwork, shoulders, grip on the club, foot placement, and breathing. Looking at the ‘bigger picture’ in relation to your swing and what effect each factor has on the others, will show you where you’re going wrong and allow you to make adjustments as required.

Chapter 7

Where to Play Golf

Though a round of golf has much to offer to a golfer, there is one significant drawback.

Finding a suitable location to play golf can be quite challenging if you don’t have a country club or public course near you.

Even if you do have a course near you, they can be quite expensive.


A round of golf isn’t cheap, and this can be a considerable barrier to entry for beginners.

The driving range, however, is significantly cheaper with many centers offering 50 or 100 balls for less than $10.

There’s not really a good way to practice real golf swings outside of playing on a course or going to the driving range. So, if you’re going to learn to play golf, you should be prepared for the reality that it costs money; a cost that is ongoing.

To help mitigate these costs, you can purchase a yearly membership at your local club; allowing you unlimited access for an all-inclusive fee.

If you golf more than a couple of dozen times over the course of a season, membership of a club is definitely worth some consideration.


Summary


Golf is one of the greatest and most popular American sports, but it remains largely neglected by many people because of some of the misconceptions and barriers to entry we’ve discussed above.

In recent years, however, it has become easier to participate in the sport as affordable gear, both new and used, continues to appear on the market; this makes it possible for anyone to enjoy golf.

Golf can seem like a complicated and frustrating sport, but it contains many life lessons and comes with very tangible rewarding results from hard work and perseverance, and it’s extremely enjoyable.

We hope you enjoyed our definitive guide and hope that it helps you on your journey to becoming the next Tiger Woods.

We’re always open to learning new things and consistently want to improve our site information, so if you think we’ve missed anything, please leave a comment!

Happy golfing!

Golf Terms

Golf Terms

Learning The Lingo

If you’re an aspiring golfer, it’s a good idea to begin familiarizing with golf terms prior to jumping in with the seasoned pro’s.

In this post, we will explore a wide variety of golf terms, both popular and obscure. Some terms are fun and can be considered golf slang, while others are significant and a necessity to understand if you’re to be considered a serious golfer; all terms are deeply rooted in the game’s history.

Having a firm grasp on these terms won’t simply allow you to better engage in camaraderie on the course and in the clubhouse, but it will also allow you to gain a deeper understanding of the game and its tradition.

This guide will explain the origins and definitions of golf terminology, and in what situations you are likely to encounter them.

By working through this guide, you can begin to widen your golfing vocabulary and impress your golfing associates!

Chapter 1

Golf Scoring Terms

Whether you’ve played golf or not, you’ve probably heard of the terms that are used to describe scoring and performance. They are some of the most commonly used phrases out there and aren’t confined to golf alone. In this section, we’ll give you the low down on all of the golf-scoring lingo you’ll ever need to know.


People commonly use golfing terms to describe situations in everyday life. For instance, if things are going just as planned, you might hear someone say:

“Par for the course!”

The fact that these terms are also used in everyday conversation makes it even more useful for you to learn them, as you can easily relate to and converse with those around you by using such phrases.

Without further delay, here is our comprehensive list of the most commonly-used golf scoring terms and what they mean.

Par

Par is likely the term that you are most familiar with and is one of the easiest golf terms to understand. The reason that we’ve started with par, is that many of the other terms that you’ll encounter in this guide build upon and are defined by their relation to par.

The term par refers to the number of strokes that a golfer would be expected to take to complete a hole.

Different holes will require a different number of strokes, and par is determined by the length, difficulty, and terrain of any given hole.

It’s a rule of thumb that par will always account for two putts. For example, for a 150-yard hole, scorers would expect a golfer to be able to hit the green with their tee shot.

From there, they get two putts to make par. Therefore, this hole would be a par-3.

Most of the time, a hole will be either a par-3, par-4, or par-5. Scorers assessing golf courses have determined that these are the most common amount of strokes needed to complete holes on a golf course.

It is possible for you to play a par-6 hole, but these are extremely rare.

Since par is the number of strokes that are considered to be necessary to complete a hole, and the primary objective of golf is to have the lowest score possible, golfers aim to finish the hole with fewer strokes than the average number of strokes it takes to complete the hole, e.g. the par.

However, if the golfer does finish the hole or the entire course with exactly as many strokes as set out by the par,, they have finished “on par.”

This means that they lived up to the scorer’s expectations and did not do better or worse.

If you are unable to make par (take more shots than par to complete a hole), or if you do even better than the par score (complete the hole in fewer strokes than par), then your score will likely be described by a different term. Let’s have a look at those!

Birdie

If you can complete a hole in fewer strokes than par, congratulations! Few golfers are ever able to do this consistently, and that’s what makes golf such an elite sport that is hard to excel in.

If you’ve ever done really well on a course, you may have heard the term ‘birdie.’ A birdie is a term used to describe a situation whereby a golfer can successfully complete a hole in one less stroke than par.

When a player achieves a birdie, their total score is decreased by 1, which is a positive outcome. For that reason, birdies are considered to be a very desirable outcome on any given hole.

Eagle

If you love getting birdies, you’ll love eagles even more! The term ‘eagle’ refers to an instance where the golfer completes the hole in two fewer shots than par.

Eagles are not very common, but they happen frequently enough that you should be familiar with the phrase. If you can get an eagle, your score will be reduced by two strokes; again, a very good outcome.

In a game like golf, every stroke matters because the leaders are often so closely grouped together. That’s why an eagle is considered to be incredibly valuable and is well sought after during a round of golf.

Double Eagle

Then we have the double eagle.

As the name suggests, the double eagle is just like the regular eagle, except one stroke better.

A double eagle is considered to be extremely rare and is hardly ever achieved. It is used to describe a hole that is completed 3 strokes under par and is also known as an ‘albatross.’

A double eagle will reduce your score by 3, but you probably won’t ever have to worry about achieving one unless you get a hole-in-one or make an incredibly accurate shot from the fairway.

Ace

To conclude our analysis of positive scoring terms, I give you, the ace…

Otherwise known as a hole-in-one, the ace is the rarest score of all, and it pretty much does what the name suggests; provides the golfer with a score of 1.

Unfortunately, aces very rarely ever happen, but when they do they are extremely helpful to your score.

An ace is the most desired outcome for a golfer and can vault them to the top of the standings very easily.

Getting an ace is a mixture of skill and luck. If you can get the ball to as close to the tee as possible on your first shot consistently, you have better odds of making an ace.

However, most golfers don’t try to get an ace: it just happens by chance.

Bogey

Unfortunately, we are at the end of our list of good terms, so we’ll move on to the scoring situations that will damage your overall score.

The first on our list is the bogey.

A bogey occurs when the player completes the hole using one more stroke than par. A bogey will raise your score by 1; an undesirable outcome.

Though bogeys are far from good, there are worse scores out there, and an amateur golfer might be okay with a bogey here and there, though not too often, of course!

Double Bogey

As you’d expect, a double bogey is a negative score just like its relative, the bogey.

And, as the name suggests, a double bogey occurs when a golfer takes 2 strokes more than par to complete a hole.

This score adds 2 points on to the golfer’s score and is very damaging to their overall result.

Pro golfers avoid double bogeys at all costs, and although they are rare, they are more common than their more positive cousin; the double eagle.

Triple Bogey

If a golfer takes 3 shots over par to complete a hole, they’ll be awarded a triple bogey.

A triple bogey is extremely rare and increases a golfer’s score by 3 strokes.

Triple bogeys are extremely detrimental to your score and could very well put you out of contention for a whole round if you don’t make up the ground quickly.

Additional Information

If you’re still having trouble understanding some of the golf-related scoring terms and you think that you would benefit from learning with the aid of a visual tool, watch this tutorial video on golf scoring terms. It will explain some of the terms that we have listed and give you a clearer idea of the scenarios that we have explored.

Chapter 2

Funny Golf Terms

As well as some pretty meaningful scoring terms, there are many less serious golfing terms that it would be useful for you to know; particularly if you are an aspiring golfer and want to ‘fit in’ at the club. You can use some of these funny golf terms to describe unique situations, poor performance, or just throw them into your chat on the course to create a jovial atmosphere.


If you’re new to golf, you might have heard some of these phrases before, but not fully understood what they meant. Don’t fret—we’ll walk you through the most common funny golf terms out there.

Army Golf

If someone uses this term in your direction, you probably need to up your putting game! This refers to a common situation that golfers face during putting where they go back and forth past the hole.

This often occurs when golfers cannot make their putts and keep over-hitting their shot, which causes them to “army golf” back and forth from each side of the hole.

Afraid of the Dark

Every golfer hopes that their ball isn’t scared of the dark! If it were, it would certainly not want to go in the hole.

This term is used to describe a ball that just won’t drop into the hole! Needless to say, in golf, it’s better to conquer your fear of the dark!

Barkie

If you have a particular talent for hitting trees, chances are you’ve heard this term once or twice. A barkie is the term used to describe a hole during which you hit a tree and can still manage to salvage the hole for par.

This term is actually a little bit of a compliment since it is tough to recover to make par after hitting a tree in most cases. If you’ve just golfed a barkie, you could have done worse!

Backhander

Alright, now you’re just showing off. It’s called a backhander when you casually tap in your ball using the wrong side of your putter on an easy putt.

Be careful though: anything can happen in golf…

Breakfast Ball

This is a term that is usually heard in the morning hours of a golf outing. That’s because it really only applies to the first hole.

A breakfast ball is an unofficial rule that gives you a free hit on your first tee. Not every golfer uses this little trick, but if you find yourself hearing it, just know that it can be a good thing!

Cabbage

If you manage to hit your ball into some dense foliage, you are in the cabbage. It’s best to avoid the cabbage, but if you aren’t able to, there’s a chance that you won’t ever see that ball again.

Coast-to-Coast Flight

Fun as this one sounds, it’s anything but fun for a golfer trying to keep a low score. A coast-to-coast flight refers to a ball that is hit from one bunker to another bunker on the opposite side of the putting green.

Since putting is so key to golf, this is a bad situation that will usually result in a bogey or even a double bogey.

Chili-Dip

If you hear this term, you may want to put in some more work on your swing. A chili-dip is a fun term for those who put a large divot in the ground with their chip swing.

This term is usually used in a lighthearted way, so don’t take it too personally if your golf partners call you out on your chili-dip!

Chicken Stick

A chicken stick is a club in your bag that you have chosen for a specific shot because it is the safe choice. More commonly, this term is used to describe a decision that you didn’t take any risks in deciding.

Chippie

A chippie shot is one that is taken from around the green. Nothing too complicated here, but if you are directed to take your ‘chippie,’ step up!

Chunk

If you are new to golf, you might have heard this jokingly directed your way a lot. If you haven’t perfected your swing just yet, there’s a good chance that you’re taking some chunks out of the ground on your swings.

This is perfectly normal, but just be prepared for your playing partners to tease you about the big old “chunks” you’re taking out of the course!

Cup

Everyone wants their ball in the cup on the first try! ‘Cup’ is a simple slang word for the hole on the course.

It’s 4.5 inches in diameter, 4 inches deep, and seemingly impossible to find at times.

Dawn Patrol

If you can’t help but get out on the course as early as possible when the sun rises, you might be playfully named dawn patrol. It’s an endearing term, but get some sleep!

DNF/DFL

These handy abbreviations each stand for something different but mean pretty much the same thing. DNF is used universally in sports and means “Did Not Finish.”

This term describes your progress (or lack thereof) if you did not successfully complete a hole.

DFL is an acronym for “Dead F***ing Last,” which means you finished but clearly didn’t do very well.

Be sure to tease your friends whenever they finish DFL!

Dammit

On the less formal side of things, we have dammit. Dammit isn’t exactly exclusive to golf, but you will hear it recited very often as golfers struggle to make par and avoid those bogeys!

Dammit is the curse of choice out on the golf course and you should be prepared to hear it—and say it—quite often!

Dance Floor

Though it might not always seem so fun for those who have putting woes, the putting green is commonly known as the dance floor. The reason for this is that the putting green is where a lot of the action happens.

You definitely want your golf ball dancing with the tee as you approach the hole! The closer your ball is to the tee, the better the music sounds, so aim small!

Double Cross

A double cross is a slightly more complicated term. This actually refers to the direction that your ball goes after you make contact with your club.

A fairly common situation for beginners, in particular, is when you are trying to curve the ball one way, and it ends up going the complete opposite way. If double crosses happen to you frequently, you may want to consider working on your spin!

Duck Hook

If you’re unable to correct your spin problems, you might be hitting duck hooks frequently. A duck hook is a ball that you have hooked exceptionally badly.

It often comes at the detriment of your score and makes it difficult to recover and make par on the hole. You might hear your friends making duck sounds if you hook a ball this badly.

Flusher

An apt name for the motion which resembles a toilet flushing, this term refers to a ball traveling all the way around the circumference of the hole before finally dropping in.

Many of us will have experienced this extreme tension and the many prayers from hopeful golfers that it elicits.

Foot Wedge

Having some trouble out there and need a competitive edge? You might resort to trying the foot wedge.

The foot wedge is the highly illegal action of kicking your ball into a better place for you to competitively continue the hole. You won’t find this happening on the PGA tour, but it wouldn’t be surprising at all to see it in a friendly weekend game at the club.

Fried Egg

We’ve all experienced a fried egg at some point in our illustrious (or not) golfing careers. A fried egg is a golf ball that has become buried in the sand bunker.

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but avoid this kind of fried egg at all costs!

Gardening

If you have caused a divot in the course from a swing gone haywire, no worries. You can just do some gardening to patch it right up!

Put the dirt back where it belongs, pat it down with your foot and you’re good to go!

This one refers to those who make fixes to the course following a particularly inaccurate swing.

Grain

This one isn’t a technical term, but it’s still useful regardless of its humor. The grain refers to the way that the grass is growing on the greens.

Similar to the way that wood can be described, the grain of the grass matters when talking about resistance and the path to the hole.

Use this one in jest, or as an excuse, but realize that it does actually refer to an important factor.

Hosel Rocket

A hosel rocket is a lot of fun for onlookers, but not so much for the golfer. This refers to the situation in which a ball is severely shanked.

This occurs when the golfer strikes the ball not with the head of the club, but rather with the shaft before the head. You have to have a pretty strange swing to accomplish this, but it can certainly be done.

Watch your head if you encounter one of these! It’s impossible to predict where they might go.

Inside the Leather

Sometimes, a putt is so close to being in the hole that your playing partners won’t make you take the shot, and it will be assumed that you’d have made it. This is a common courtesy amongst friends but is never used in a professional setting.

If you are determined to be ‘inside the leather,’ you can pick up your ball and start thinking about the next hole.

James Joyce

This refers to a putt that has a very difficult line to the hole. A ‘James Joyce’ is most often the result of unpredictable terrain and many slopes standing in your path to the hole.

Knockdown

If you are playing in the wind, you might hear this term; given to a shot that is designed to stay out of the wind. It is shot intentionally low to plow through minor winds and avoid stronger winds that reside the higher you go in the air.

Knockdown might be an informal term, but it’s an authentic strategy used on the course.

Mud Ball

Hearing this term just once will make you want to wash off your golf ball or retrieve a new one. A mud ball is a difficult situation in which your ball becomes covered in mud.

This makes it hard to hit accurately, as you never know which way it might go when it leaves your club.

Platypus

This type of play is named after the platypus, which is a fairly uncommon species. This term is appropriate when a golfer is still able to make par after hitting the ball out of bounds.

Since it is rare to see this happen on the course, they gave it a rare name.

Rush Limbaugh

This ball is so far to the right that it resembles Rush Limbaugh! This is just a fun way to describe the extreme direction that your ball went in.

Sandbagger

This is not an endearing term, as it’s actually a name used to describe someone who has skewed the game in their favor. You might be called a Sandbagger if your playing partners determine that you are a much better player than what you led everyone to believe.

Another name for this would be a “hustler.” It describes someone who is almost certainly better than what their handicap suggests.

Sharkie

This cute term is used to describe a hole during which you hit your ball in the water but still recover to make par. It’s rare to see, but if you are lucky enough to overcome this predicament, you may hear your friends yelling ‘Sharkie!’.

Ted Kennedy

Like the Rush Limbaugh, this term is used to describe a ball that is hit extremely in one direction. In this case, the ball is hit sharply to the left.

That Dog Will Hunt

This is something you might hear the other members of your party say after you strike a tee shot exceptionally well. They’re letting you know that the ball was hit well and accurately, and it was a job well done by you.

Three Jack

The three jack is not something you want to experience. It means that you took 3 putts to sink your ball and it probably put you over par.

It’s unfortunate, but you can always go out on the next hole and make it up with a birdie if you keep your cool!

USGA

You might hear this if you hit a terrible shot that warrants a USGA. This stands for “ugly shot, go again” in golf circles, and it’s best to avoid situations in which this term is needed. It’s all in good fun, but not so great for your score.

Wormburner

This quirky term is used to describe a ball that keeps rolling and rolling and rolling…and rolling.

It’s named in honor of all the worms that it likely “burns” on its way to, or past the tee.

Wormburners aren’t inherently bad, but they can be frustrating when they roll on past the tee and seem to last for an eternity.

Yips

Yips are what you might get when you are about to hit a chip shot or take an important putt.

It prevents you from striking the ball well and could be compared to the jitters (nerves).

It’s hard to maintain your composure, and a bout of the yips might earn you some heckling from your friends.


Summary

So there we have it.

As you’ll now be aware, there is an abundance of unique golf terms out there, but we’ve in no way covered them all. If you feel we’ve missed any, drop your favorites into the comments!

Golfing is an incredibly charming and historical sport and this is reflected in the vast array of terminology and slang used within the game.

After familiarizing yourself with the golf terms above, you should be in a strong position to effectively integrate with the other members at your club and enjoy yourself out on the course.

Hopefully, you find yourself using all the good terms, and fewer bad ones.

Either way, have fun out there and get ready to throw your new terms into conversation whilst you chat around the holes!